News / Blog

PASIC 2019 Program

We are thrilled to be headlining at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention (PASIC)! We can’t wait to share new works with an audience of percussionists from all over the world.

You can view our full program here: PASIC 2019 Program.

 

Buy sheet music for “Niagara”, from our Paddle to the Sea album

Contact us to buy sheet music for “Perfectly Voiceless” by Devonté Hynes, from our new album, Fields

Buy “Death Wish” by Gemma Peacocke

Buy our album Perpetulum, featuring the title track by Philip Glass, along with music written by TCP ensemble members
(sheet music for “Perpetulum” is not yet available)

Buy “Torched and Wrecked” by TCP member David Skidmore, from our album Perpetulum

 

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Intern Spotlight: Thomas Levine

It’s fall, and we’re reminiscing about one of our awesome summer interns: Thomas Levine. Thomas worked with us for a couple of weeks this summer, overlapping with the last intern in our Intern Spotlight series, Justin Lamb—they certainly were a dynamic duo! Thank you so much for your hard work, Thomas!


Where are you from?

I’m from Arlington, Virginia.

What is one thing about yourself that you’d want everyone to know?

I met Cory from Cory in The House when I was a kid.

Give us a link to something about you.

This was an amazing opportunity to be featured as an Arts student taking a STEM class—read about it here.

What are you up to these days?

I am pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Jazz Performance Degree from Virginia Commonwealth University.

 

When did you intern with TCP?

June 2-June 14, 2019

How did you connect with TCP?

I met Third Coast Percussion through their masterclass at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Did you gain anything from the internship that you’d like to share?

It never hurts to send an email. Although this seems straightforward, I learned that a lot can be gained from just reaching out.

What else did you do while interning with TCP?

I helped to construct a MASSIVE bell stand for an upcoming piece.

Did you leave a legacy or mark on the organization that you’re particularly proud of?

Helping find rehearsal space and equipment for the Bell Ringers project. I can’t wait to see how it turns out!

Favorite memory from the internship?

Attending a recording session with composer Augusta Read Thomas.

 

If you were a cartoon character, who would you be?

Aang from Avatar the Last Airbender without any doubt

A funny or embarrassing story from the internship? 

I never used the coffee maker after the first day because I forgot if something needed to be unplugged in order to avoid short-circuiting the studio.

A GIF or YouTube link that sums up your experience with TCP?

https://gph.is/2ploKFx


Our interns can experience every part of TCP’s organization, from visiting recording sessions to writing grants and everything in between. And we accept interns almost year-round! If you’re interesting in learning more about an internship with Third Coast, please contact Sean Connors at [email protected].

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Intern Spotlight: Justin Lamb

It’s summer, and that means we’ve been joined by some wonderful interns! Today’s Intern Spotlight shines on Justin Lamb. We were lucky to snag Justin in between his two years at the Eastman School of Music, where he’s now wrapping up a Master’s degree in Percussion Performance. Thank you so much for all your hard work, Justin, and best wishes for finishing school!


Where are you from?

Greenville, SC

What is one thing about yourself that you’d want everyone to know?

I’m an avid fan of napping and waking up very confused, eating so much that it hurts, and Spikeball, but probably not in that order.

Give us a link to something about you.

Here’s a link to a performance video on my YouTube channel and here’s a link to an album full of percussion arrangements of John Psathas music that I took part in while at Furman University with my professor Dr. Omar Carmenates and some other cool cats. You can read more about what I’m up to at my website: jlambmusic.com

What are you up to these days?

Currently entering the second and final year of my MM degree in percussion at Eastman!

 

When did you intern with TCP?

May 28-June 14, 2019

How did you connect with TCP?

I heard about the internship through Andrew Bockman and Noel Holloway who were interns the previous year. The Arts Leadership Program at Eastman helped me connect with Sean.

Did you gain anything from the internship that you’d like to share?

While at TCP, I learned about many different things that are encompassed in the field of arts administration and it’s hard to describe this all in a concise manner here. But, the biggest takeaway was seeing how the group manages the artistic side of their work (rehearsing, performing, working with composers, etc.) with their administrative duties (development, budgeting, planning, booking, etc.). They were all very organized and efficient at what they do. Also, I learned some pretty cool extended techniques using electronic toothbrushes.

What else did you do while interning with TCP?

I went to Andy’s Jazz Club and Kingston Mines, went to a Cubs game at Wrigley, saw an outdoor concert downtown featuring the L&M Duo with live dance and painting (and incidentally met Marc Mellits there as well), went to a ~Nois concert at Constellation, and ate too much food. Also watched season 4 of Black Mirror on Netflix which really messed me up. Oh yeah and the L&M Duo concert was interrupted by ~500 naked bicyclists riding through downtown which was quite amusing.

Did you leave a legacy or mark on the organization that you’re particularly proud of?

I wouldn’t say I left a legacy or mark on the organization per se, but I did create a fairly fleshed out database of percussion quartets by underrepresented composers that will hopefully be helpful in the future for both TCP (and myself).

Favorite memory from the internship?

Colin (studio manager), Thomas (another TCP intern), and I were tasked to build a stand for a giant bell (~300lbs) from Burma. After we finished building the stand, we hung the bell and got to hit it. That moment was quite fulfilling to say the least.

 

If you were a cartoon character, who would you be?

Well I took a cartoon character personality test and got Fred Flintstone…? Yabba-Dabba-Do!

A funny or embarrassing story from the internship? 

Thomas and I were packing up instruments for a recording session the next day with Augusta Read Thomas & TCP at the Symphony Center. We saw a marimba in the middle of the room and just assumed that it needed to be packed up, without really thinking about it. We realized we had one too many marimbas on the truck the next day… whoops. But, everything was okay because TCP was leaving for Notre Dame the following day and would have needed the marimba packed any way. Crisis avoided.

A GIF or YouTube link that sums up your experience with TCP?

This is definitely one of my favorite videos ever. Not entirely related to my experience with TCP, but I did find myself sneezing an abnormal amount while in Chicago.

 


Our intern can experience every part of TCP’s organization, from visiting recording sessions to writing grants and everything in between. If you’re interesting in learning more about an internship with Third Coast, please contact Sean Connors at [email protected].

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Detailed Program Notes for “Currents 2019”: Give Us the Night – Amanda Feery

Amanda’s  Website:  https://www.amanda-feery.com/

Listen to some of her music:

“Pushing Air” – her epic orchestral work

Square Pushers” – vocal quintet for written our pals Quince

Amanda Feery is an Irish composer working with acoustic, electronic, and improvised music. Much of her inspiration comes from literature, folklore, and the natural world. Collaborators include Alarm Will Sound, the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra, Amatis Trio, Crash Ensemble, Ensemble Mise-en, Bearthoven, RTÉ ConTempo Quartet, Chamber Choir Ireland, Mivos Quartet, Dither, Quince Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, Orkest de Eriprijs, This is How We Fly, Lisa Moore, Michelle O’Rourke, and Paul Roe. Future projects include works for flautist Lina Andonovska, {Trés}, and a collaboration with Irish filmmaker Tadhg O’Sullivan, on a cinematic ode to the moon. She recently completed her doctorate at Princeton University, and now resides in Dublin.

 

Give Us the Night was written for Third Coast Percussion’s Emerging Composers Partnership program. So far, Amanda has traveled the farthest to take part in our partnership, coming all the way from Dublin to workshop ideas with us in our Chicago studio.  Here we are having way too much fun picking out small quirky sounds for what would eventually become Peter’s part:

 

When Amanda first shared some of the ideas for her piece that she wanted to try out with us, she described the experience of walking down a street at night and hearing the muted music of a party going on inside a house or a bar in the distance.  Suddenly, the door swings open as someone enters or exits and you get a brief window into the musical world that otherwise seemed veiled and impenetrable.  We experimented with all sorts of things to try to achieve this effect, including covering drums with towels and then suddenly removing them to change from a muted sound to something more present.

Amanda’s thoughts on the work:

“I imagined Give Us The Night as a short film. We come upon the exterior of an abandoned space where faint remnants of disco patterns begin to filter through. Muddy kicks and corroded bells covered in webs eventually come into focus, and it is revealed that this supposedly abandoned space is teeming with revellers. The inspiration for the piece comes from exploring abandoned nightclub spaces on a U.S. road-trip. I was fascinated by the atmosphere of these spaces. They go beyond existing as a physical space; their walls have stories to tell.

“The piece particularly explores patterns, timbres, and harmonies from early house music, a style that has its origins in Chicago and Detroit. What interests me most about these now defunct spaces, is that they were some of the most inclusive, non-segregated, LGBTQ+-friendly spaces in the U.S. We are losing this in our current underground night-spaces—losing ways of listening and moving, losing a feeling of community in order for these spaces to be replaced by coffee chains, unaffordable apartments, and luxury hotels.”

 

Special thanks to Culture Ireland for their generous support of this project!

 

 

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Detailed Program Notes for “Currents 2019”: Half Light – Taylor Rankin

Check out Half Light by Taylor Rankin performed by the composer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-SWhsOgaiQ

Listen to more of Taylor’s music here: 

http://www.taylorjoshuarankin.com/listen

http://www.taylorjoshuarankin.com/composer-bioworks

Some thoughts about Half Light:

Third Coast got to know composer Taylor Joshua Rankin through Denison University’s TUTTI Festival hosted by our friend Ching-chu Hu, an incredibly unique new music festival in which absolutely ever single composer who has a work on the festival attends and the Denison students performing most of the works have the incredible opportunity of interacting in person with the composer of each piece they are playing. Taylor’s piece Half Light was selected through a very competitive call-for-scores process for TCP to perform on the festival. We became both giant fans Denison, Ching-chu, and Taylor in the same week 🙂 

Taylor is a young, dynamic artist whose work is influenced by American and European minimalism, art-rock, and electronic. Commended by Grammy-award winning Bay Area composer Mason Bates for having “a great ear harmony and texture”, he stands out as an exceptional artist of his craft.  His work has been played by many groups including Friction Quartet, Redshift Ensemble, and the NYU Marimba Ensemble. 

The term minimalist often refers to anything that has been reduced to its essentials. Combined with the artistic compositional techniques of art-rock and the tools of electronic music, Taylor has forged a distinct sound for his work. Aspects of his compositional works like instrumentation and harmonic detail reflect the features of these artistic movements.

Half Light features an extensive use of electronics and sampled sounds. Various samples including the buzzing of cicadas, the sound of rain falling, and differently tuned harmonicas create a sense of immersion into the unique character of the piece. Taylor recommends listening while driving fast or while walking down a wooded trail.  TCP recommends coming to our Currents show on Sunday to hear us open the concert with this jam! 

 

Notes by TCP intern Thomas Levine, June 2019

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